The Music Never Stopped

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I had no idea what I was getting into when I played the 2011 DVD The Music Never Stopped. Since I grew up in the 1960s, I was able to relate to many of the issues that were central to the story. It's about the relationship between young Gabriel Sawyer and his father, Henry. Henry had instilled the love of music in his son at a young age. When Gabriel was a teenager, he was the member of a typical rock band. His father insisted he go to college, even though Gabriel wasn't sure it was for him. On the night Gabriel wants to go to a Grateful Dead concert, his father makes him attend a college night at his school. Gabriel sneaks out to go to the concert, but the concert is sold out. His father is not pleased. He tells Gabriel he cannot see his girlfriend anymore. The final straw comes when Gabriel invites his parents to his band's performance and someone buns an American flag. His parents leave before Gabriel can play a tribute for them. When Gabriel gets home, he gets involved in an argument about the Vietnam War. Since his father's brother had been killed in action, his father takes Gabriel's antiwar stand as a slight to his uncle. Gabriel storms out and disappears - apparently travelling to Greenwich Village to see many of his favorite musicians perform.

Twenty years later, Gabriel's parents are called to a hospital where he had an operation for a brain tumor. He had been found wandering the streets of the city. The doctors explain that Gabriel has no short term memory. He eventually moves into a psychiatric hospital. Henry does some research to see how he can help his son. He finds an article on the use of music therapy to help people like his son. Henry then hires a music teacher to work with his son. They discover they can communicate with Gabriel through the music of his generation. His father sells all his old records to buy albums that his son used to listen too. Henry is able to get tickets for a Grateful Dead concert after weeks of trying to call into a radio station. Gabriel and Henry attend the concert, and rekindle their bond.

This movie is very powerful. The actors are sensational, and the sound track is incredible. It's different. That's what makes it stand out. The Vietnam War tore many families apart. This movie explores this tear in the family fabric. You can learn a lot from this movie.
-Carl

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This page contains a single entry published on January 2, 2014 9:00 PM.

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