City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas

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Click for availability and more information City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas, by Roger Crowley
 
Venice has remained an extraordinarily dazzling city set on a series of islands in a lagoon off the northern coast of Italy. While it has gathered many romantic and fanciful nicknames over the years, perhaps the most appropriate is Stato da Mar or State across the Sea. And, the trading across the sea was the source of the riches that made Venice into a great empire for centuries. Roger Crowley's latest book, City of Fortune: How Venice Ruled the Seas, is a terrifically readable and fascinating history of the rise of the Venetian Empire. With his clear and concise writing style, he relates how the commercially-driven city of Venice grew into a strong, wealthy and colonizing force in the Mediterranean and Black Seas. Venetians became extremely efficient in establishing seaside cities as their exclusive trading zones. And, the profit to Venice was huge. Crowley uses primary sources with ease and the descriptions give the reader a first-hand glimpse into the Venetian world of commerce. Equally, the growth of Venice as military power is described. Perhaps the most vivid is the participation of Venice in the Fourth Crusade. That was a horrendously destructive expedition designed to re-establish Christian power over the Holy Land. Venice played a key role in conquering and pillaging Constantinople. However, that control only lasted several decades during the Thirteen Century. In all, City of Fortune is a highly recommended historical account of the rise and fall of the Venetian Empire.
-Roy

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This page contains a single entry published on April 16, 2012 4:33 PM.

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