October 2011 Archives

Deus Ex: Human Revolution

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Click for availability and more information Deus Ex: Human Revolution, developed by Eidos Montreal, published by Square Enix
 
Sarif Industries logoThe year is 2027 and you are Adam Jensen, in-house security specialist for Sarif Industries, a company on the leading edge of augmentation technology for the repair and enhancement of human beings. When you and your company suddenly fall prey to a vicious attack perpetrated by a lethally efficient group of augmented assailants, you do your best to counter the attack--hopelessly outmatched as you are--and wind up broken, bleeding, and left for dead. But, as it turns out, there are some perks included when you work for a major biotechnology company, Sarif's awesome health benefits package being one of them.
Sarif Industries.Sarif Industries
Sarif rescues you from the brink of death, at the same time outfitting you with some of the most advanced military-grade augmentations available. Armed with a veritable arsenal of weapons and abilities befitting a modern-day super-soldier, you vow to hunt down and serve justice upon those responsible for mutilating you and murdering your co-workers.

The Wampanoag Tribe of Martha's Vineyard

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Click for availability and more information The Wampanoag Tribe of Martha's Vineyard, by Thomas Dresser
 
My grandmother (my mother's mother) used to always say that we were related to a Civil War hero named Major Bailey, who married a Wampanoag Indian. When my wife saw The Wampanoag Tribe of Martha's Vineyard, she brought it home for me. This book has a lot to offer, not just for descendants, but for anyone interested in understanding Native American history and culture.

The Wampanoags believe in a legendary ancestor named Moshup, who lived on the western end of Martha's Vineyard. He cut down all the wood over time for his cooking fire. That's why this area lacks trees. He would smoke his pipe, which causes the morning fog. When the White man came to colonize Martha's Vineyard, Moshup hid in the woods. The Wampanoags believe they are custodians of the environment. They don't believe they actually own the land. When white colonists came, their main focus was on converting the Native-Americans to embrace Christianity. The colonists also managed to get land from the Wampanoags, who probably didn't understand the transaction. Fortunately, the United States government finally recognized the tribe and reinstated their land.

The Wampanoags have embraced their heritage and customs. They are a proud people, as they should be. On a small scale, this book addresses the plight of the Native -American. Fortunately, it also chronicles the "rebound" of the culture. Many prominent Wampanoags have made great contributions to Martha's Vineyard in a variety of ways. The future looks very promising for these natives.
-Carl

Arguably Essays

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Click for availability and more information Arguably Essays, by Christopher Hitchens
 
As a regular reader of Vanity Fair magazine, I was thrilled when writer and contributing editor Christopher Hitchens (Vanity Fair, Slate, and The Atlantic) came out with a book of some of his controversial and thought-provoking essays. Topics range from history, culture and politics; from yesterday as well as today. Notable figures such as Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and Abraham Lincoln are presented in almost a surreal way, far from the historical references we all learned about in school. Don't assume that this book is just loathsome rantings from a somewhat bitter man that is in the last stages of his life. There are also observations about things that happen in everyday life, to humorous essays such as "Why Women Aren't Funny". The book is a large one, with 749 pages, but will hold your interest throughout, as the reader will crave what the next essay holds.
-Debbie O.

Dying to Meet You

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Click for availability and more information Dying to Meet You, by Kate Klise
 
I.B. Grumply has writer's block. So the popular children's author rents a house on Old Cemetery Road for a quiet place to write the 13th book in his "Ghost Tamer" series. Grumply soon finds out he's not alone in the house. A young boy and his cat live in the house and claim it is haunted by friendly ghost writer Olive C. Spence. A very funny story told through letters, newspaper articles and other documents.
-Deirdre

The Bears on Hemlock Mountain

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Click for availability and more information The Bears on Hemlock Mountain, by Alice Dalgliesh
 
Eight-year-old Jonathan is sent by his mother on a journey alone, up over Hemlock Mountain to borrow an iron pot. He has been told there are NO bears on Hemlock Mountain and tries hard to overcome his fears. Won Newberry Honor Award in 1953.
-Deirdre

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