This month, students looking to launch programs for their peers can attend a Student Leadership Council meeting and aspiring filmmakers can attend the Junior League of Greenwich Youth Film Festival. In celebration of National Library Week, Student Leaders sponsor Teen Movie Night featuring The Hunger Games: Mockingjay

The Library's regularly scheduled teen programs, including Friday Night Chess and Middle School Book Club meet monthly and are open to all without reservation or charge unless otherwise indicated. 

Thursday, April 2 at 7 p.m., Student Leadership Council Meeting 
Students in grades 7-12 gather at Teen Central on the second floor to brainstorm about using library resources to initiate and execute projects relevant to their peer group in exchange for community service hours. Refreshments will be served. 

Friday, April 10 at 7 p.m., Friday Night Chess 
National Master Rich Jackson will provide instruction, supervise play and challenge students to an occasional match. All ages and skill levels are welcome. Bring a love of the game or a desire to learn. 

Thursday, April 16 at 6:30 p.m., Teen Movie Night: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay 
To celebrate National Library Week, Student Leaders will be screening The Hunger Games: Mockingjay based on one of the most popular young adult book series in the publishing world. Starring Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen. 

Saturday, April 18 at 1 p.m., Preparing Students for the Newly Revised SAT 
Dr. Mark Yin, a math tutor from Yin Academy and his associate Ms. Anna Warm, a verbal tutor will advise on preparation and strategies for succeeding on the newly revised SAT and PSAT tests. They will also explore characteristics of AP testing in Math and English. 

Thursday, April 23 at 4:30 p.m., Middle School Book Club 
Middle School Book Club is for literature fans in grades 6-8. This month's title is See You at Harry's by Jo Knowles. Fern feels invisible in her family, where Sarah is working at the family restaurant, Holden is struggling with bullies, and Charlie is the center of attention. When tragedy strikes, the bond holding the family together is stretched almost to the breaking point. Register for the program and pick up a copy of the book at the 2nd floor reference desk. 

Other Library programs of interest to students and parents:
• On Thursday, April 9 at 6:30 p.m. Cult Films presents the offbeat original film Donnie Darko (2001). 
• On Thursday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m. GHS graduate Stefanie O'Connell, financial & millennial budget guru, shares the secrets of her online and social media success. 
 • On Saturday, April 26 at 1 p.m., the Junior League of Greenwich will screen the winning films at the 4th Annual Greenwich Youth Film Festival. 
• On Saturdays in April from 1-1:30 p.m., Student Tech Support Orientation/Training is available for students wanting to volunteer at Greenwich Library.

For more information about Greenwich Library programs for students in grades 6-12, email Teen Services Librarian Ed Morrissey, call (203) 622-7918, or visit www.greenwichlibrary.org/teens.

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Greenwich Library has six exciting business programs planned for April. Nonprofits can learn to develop individual donors and small businesses can learn more about integrating social media into their marketing plans and how to market their content. Later in the month, The World Affairs Forum will present an inside look at the global human trafficking industry as part of its Great Decisions Program in the Cole Auditorium. 

Programs are held in the Library Meeting Room unless otherwise indicated. Experienced librarians are available to help you navigate the Library's extensive databases, directories, investor information and nonprofit resources via email or in person. 

Wednesday, April 8 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Cultivate Your Individual Donor 
For most nonprofits, individual donors are their bread and butter when it comes to raising funds. This workshop will help nonprofits enhance and improve the essential relationship with their donors. Aspects of the donor/recipient bond will be examined relative to prospects, casual donors, major supporters, board members, and lapsed donors. The full range of donor relations will be explored, with highly practical advice and interactive exercises incorporated to reinforce what is learned.
  
Monday, April 13 from 2-3:30 p.m., LinkedIn for Beginners: Part 1 
This hands-on workshop explores the bare basics of setting up an account and using the basic functionality and settings. This class is for the person who struggles with technology basics and needs step-by-step support. Presented by Noelle Gross. Part 2 will be held on April 27. A Technology Training Center program.

Monday, April 13 from 6:30-8 p.m., Introduction to Social Media for Small Business 
This workshop will review the primary social media channels used by small business for their online marketing efforts, and discuss how to decide which are right for you. This program is co-sponsored with the Technology Training Center and presented by Robert Clark, LucidPointe.com in the Meeting Room. *Rescheduled from March 5. 

Wednesday, April 22 from 6:00-8:00 p.m., SCORE: Content Marketing 
The profusion of digital channels has turned Content Marketing into a business in of itself. More than just creating content on the internet to promote a product or service, businesses are discovering there is value in the content itself. This workshop will focus on how to evaluate your existing content, how to craft & publish new content and how to ensure your content marketing will produce results for your business. Presenter, Deirdre Silberstein; Moderator, Jeff Seaver. 

Thursday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m., Millennial Budget Guru Stefanie O'Connell
Greenwich High School grad Stefanie O'Connell, author of The Broke and Beautiful Life: Small Town Budget Big City Dreams, offers millennials accessible financial advice, budgeting and frugality tips. O'Connell will also share the secrets of her online and social media success. This author talk is part of the Money Smart Week initiative and will be held in the Library Meeting Room. This event is especially recommended for Greenwich parents and their boomerangs. A Technology Training Center program. 

Monday, April 27 at 2 p.m., LinkedIn for Beginners: Part 2 
In part 2 we'll continue to explore this critical professional platform and expand on the basic functionality as well as maneuvering within the site. Workshop attendees should already have a LinkedIn profile set up (though all are welcome, even without a profile). This workshop will be less hands-on than part 1 and more visual. Presented by Noelle Gross. A Technology Training Center program. 

Monday, April 27 at 7 p.m., World Affairs Forum Great Decisions Program - Human Trafficking 
Migration expert Joseph Chamie will present an inside look at human trafficking, the fastest growing criminal industry in the world, accounting for billions in international trade each year. Joseph Chamie is a former Director of the United Nations Population Division and of the New York Center for Migration Studies and editor of the International Migration Review. The program is open to all at no charge and will be held in the Library's Cole Auditorium. 

Bloomberg Terminal Access Patrons can sign up to use the Bloomberg Professional Service computer at the Main Reference Desk or sign up in advance by calling (203) 622-7910.

Business programs and services are made available to Library patrons at no charge through the support of the Greenwich Library Board of Trustees and contributions by generous donors. For more information email Business Librarian Mary Cuff, call (203) 622-6560, or visit www.greenwichlibrary.org/business.

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The Technology Training Center presents a wide variety of programs this April including workshops on Excel, LinkedIn for Beginners, and iDevices. TTC will also present Greenwich native Stefanie O'Connell, author of The Broke and Beautiful Life who will talk about her success online and budgeting for millennials. All year long, Greenwich Library training staff is available to help you explore new technologies and develop the skills you need to make your online life more productive and enjoyable. 

Classes are offered in a comfortable environment for all participants, regardless of level, and are open to the public at no charge. 

Wednesday, April 8 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., Career Coach: Microsoft Excel
Sponsored by Southwestern CTWorks, the Career Coach is offering two, 2-hour Microsoft Excel training sessions. Level 1 training is at 10 am and level 2 at 1 pm. The Coach bus is fully equipped with 10 PC work stations and Internet access and is parked outside the Library's West Putnam Avenue entrance. Arrive early to sign-up.

Monday, April 13 from 6:30-8 p.m., LinkedIn for Beginners
This hands-on workshop explores the bare basics of setting up an account and using the basic functionality and settings. This class is for the person who struggles with technology basics and needs step-by-step support. Presented by Noelle Gross. Part 2 will be held on April 27.

Monday, April 13 from 6:30-8 p.m., Introduction to Social Media for Small Business 
We'll review the primary social media channels used by small business for their online marketing efforts, and cover the attributes of each one and how to decide if it is right for you. This program is co-sponsored with the Peterson Business Programs and presented by Robert Clark, LucidPointe.com in the Meeting Room. *Rescheduled from March 5. 

Wednesday, April 15 at 11 a.m., Apple Devices: iTunes
Learn how to navigate iTunes for movies, music, audiobooks, etc. We will also cover how to access Library digital collections for your Apple devices. Presented by Lance Pendleton. 

Friday, April 17 at 2 p.m., Basic Computing 
In this class we will first assess the needs of attendees, then review basic computer and Internet use including search, email, creating documents and file management. Newbies welcome! 

Wednesday, April 22 from 6:00-8:30 p.m., SCORE Content Marketing 
The profusion of digital channels has turned Content Marketing into a valuable business in of itself. This workshop will focus on how to evaluate your existing content, how to craft & publish new content and how to ensure your content marketing will produce results for your business. Presenter, Deirdre Silberstein; Moderator, Jeff Seaver. A Peterson Business Program. 

Thursday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m., Author Talk: Millennial Budget Guru Stefanie O'Connell 
Greenwich High School grad Stefanie O'Connell, author of The Broke and Beautiful Life: Small Town Budget Big City Dreams, offers millennials accessible financial advice, budgeting and frugality tips. O'Connell will also share the secrets of her online and social media success. This author talk is part of the Money Smart Week initiative and will be held in the Library Meeting Room. This event is especially recommended for Greenwich parents and their boomerangs. 

Monday, April 27 from 2-3:30 p.m., LinkedIn for Beginners: Part 2 
In part 2 we'll continue to explore this critical professional platform and expand on the basic functionality as well as maneuvering within the site. Workshop attendees should already have a LinkedIn profile set up (though all are welcome, even without a profile). This workshop will be less hands-on than part 1 and more visual. Presented by Noelle Gross. 

Wednesday, April 29 at 11 a.m., Trending Monthly TV: How to Cut the Cable Cord 
Learn how streaming and subscription services and even a TV antenna could help you cut the cord, or at least reduce your bill. Trending Monthly is a new program designed to improve quality of life by introducing and demonstrating what's hot and trending in technology - ranging from productivity, personal and family use, safety and security. Instructor, Lance Pendleton, Director of Education, MacInspires.

Regular Library Technology Training Center Programming 
Every Saturday in April from 1 to 1:30 p.m., students can attend Volunteer Orientation for Tech Support positions. The Library's regular Drop-in Computer Lab is offered three times each week: on Saturdays and Tuesdays at 11 a.m., and Thursdays at 3 p.m., from April 7-27 (no lab April 2 and 4). Get hands-on assistance with new gadgets, downloading eBooks and audiobooks using OverDrive, Library databases, Microsoft Office, Internet search, email, online forms, social media, job search, basic computing and more with Library staff. Use your own device or practice with ours. 

For more information email Training Center staff, call (203) 625-6508, or visit www.greenwichlibrary.org/TechnologyTrainingCenter.aspx.

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AuthorsLive@GreenwichLibrary presents New York Times bestselling author Andrew Gross on Tuesday, April 7 at 7 p.m. in the Meeting Room. Ty Hauck, Gross' fictional head of detectives in Greenwich is back in One Mile Under, which goes on sale on April 7. 

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Gross will discuss his writing career, strokes of fortune and the latest title in his popular detective series. Ty Hauck was first introduced in The Dark Tide as the head of detectives in Greenwich, CT, and then brought back in Don't Look Twice where he investigated some of Greenwich's elite. In the third book, Reckless, Hauck left the Greenwich force for the private sector and uncovered a terrorist plot. 

In One Mile Under, Hauck travels to Aspen to investigate a murder and becomes embroiled in a deadly confrontation between desperate farmers in a drought-ridden Colorado town and a ruthless energy company. 

Says Publishers Weekly, "Engrossing. ... chock full of menacing characters willing to do the dirtiest of work. This David and Goliath story will thrill series fans and newcomers alike." 

Andrew Gross received a degree in English from Middlebury College (where he edited the literary magazine) and a Masters in Business Policy from Columbia University. After working for many years in the apparel business, he left the corporate world to attend the Writer's Program at the University of Iowa. At age 46 he completed his first novel, Hydra, which came to the attention of James Patterson, who felt that Gross was particularly skilled at capturing women's voices. A successful collaboration began. In 2006, Gross wrote his own novel, The Blue Zone and has had a series of bestsellers ever since, including the popular Ty Hauck detective series. His books have been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Gross and his wife live in Westchester County, NY. 

AuthorsLive@GreenwichLibrary is made possible through the support of the Greenwich Library Board of Trustees and contributions by generous donors. Books will be available for purchase and signing through Diane's Books. This series is open to all at no charge, but seating in the Meeting Room is limited and will be available on a first come, first served basis. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. 

For more information call Marianne Weill at 203-622-7933 or visit www.greenwichlibrary.org/authorslive.

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Shakespearean raconteur Bob Smith will lead his devoted Greenwich Library Shakespeare fans on a wide ranging discussion of Romeo and Juliet beginning Wednesday, April 1 at 7 p.m. in the Cole Auditorium. For his 26th session at Greenwich Library, Smith selected one of Shakespeare's most loved works.

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Says Smith, "In the ten years we've been exploring these great texts, it's hard to believe that we are only now getting to this wonderful early work. I've directed this divine play three times and can't wait to have a go at it for seven whole weeks with my Greenwich group." 

Smith describes what makes Romeo and Juliet such an exciting play to discuss. "It's 1594. New to London life, Will Shakespeare's been amassing all the creative energy that propels genius. And he scored a direct hit with this young play about young people. The language is extraordinary. For 3,400 lines, passion pushes poetry to where it's never been before, and more than four centuries later, it still WOWS us! Oh that balcony scene...and the Queen Mab speech...the Nurse...the Friar...the culmination in the Tomb. What a play! Please join me." 

"O speak again bright angel, for thou art as glorious to this night, being o'er my head as is a winged messenger of heaven..."  

Library Journal called Bob Smith "the teacher we all should have had to introduce us to Shakespeare." The Boston Globe called him "inspired and inspiring." 

The class will run for seven consecutive Wednesdays from April 1 through May 13 (film on May 13) and is open to all at no charge. The Shakespeare series is made possible through the support of the Greenwich Library Board of Trustees and contributions by generous donors. Copies of the play will be provided. For more information, please email Matthew Sgritta or call (203) 622-7972.

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Librarian Ed Morrissey's new monthly film series is devoted to bringing patrons classic cult movies from Hollywood, Europe and the rest of the world. On Thursday, April 9 at 6:30 p.m., Cult Films will screen the chillingly supernatural Donnie Darko from 2001. Both film buffs and ingénues are welcome. 

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In this offbeat but exciting debut feature film by writer/director Richard Kelly, Donnie, a troubled teenager (Jake Gyllenhaal) is plagued by visions of a large, creepy bunny rabbit that manipulates him into committing a series of crimes after narrowly escaping a bizarre accident. Gyllenhaal does 'alienated teen' like no other. 

Donnie, a violent schizophrenic who recently went off his meds, is being influenced by beings from another universe as they attempt to correct distorted 'time loop' that will cause the world to end. The filming is has a surreal quality and many déjà vu moments for the audience to puzzle over, such as the multiple scenes of Gretchen waving to Rose. 

Donnie Darko was filmed in 28 days on a budget of $4.5 million. It almost went straight to home video but was publicly released by Drew Barrymore's production company. While the film had a successful first screening at the Sundance Film Festival in 2001, it enjoyed a less than successful debut in US theatres shortly after the September 11 terror attacks. The film grossed just under $7.7 million worldwide but has since received favorable reviews from critics and developed something of a cult following, resulting in the release of a director's cut special edition DVD in 2004. 

Donnie Darko kept gaining momentum. During the time of the film's DVD release, the Pioneer Theatre in New York City's East Village began midnight screenings that continued for 28 consecutive months. Darko is a classic example of a commercial film failure resuscitated by audience demand, not the dictates of the market, hence its cult status. 

Up next: mark your calendars for another James Bond classic, Thunderball (1965) on Thursday, May 14. 

In the course of this series, Morrissey will cover a wide sweep of genres, comedies, crime noir, horror, thrillers, musicals, spaghetti westerns, Hitchcock, Fellini and more. It's these so-called fringe or over the top movies that Greenwich Library Cult Films, through the Library's extensive catalog, intends to expose to a much wider and appreciative audience. 

Patrons interested in cult films should This series is open to all at no charge and will be held in the Meeting Room. Don't forget, thousands of film titles are available in the Library's DVD collection, and online through the Library's new hoopla service.

For more information email Ed Morrissey, call (203) 622-7918 or visit www.greenwichlibrary.org/CultFilms.aspx to read some of Ed's deep dives into the world of cult films in his blog. 
AuthorsLive@GreenwichLibrary presents Authors M.J. Rose and Alyson Richman on Tuesday, April 21 at 7 p.m. in the Meeting Room. These prolific and talented authors will hold an intimate conversation about their latest books, their craft, and the themes of loss and hope, passion and suspense. 

New York Times bestselling novelist and Greenwich resident M.J. Rose has created a provocative and magical new spellbinder in a gothic novel set in 1890's Paris. First in a new trilogy, The Witch of Painted Sorrows is a LibraryReads Top Ten choice for March 2015 and an Indie Next pick for April. 

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                                                            Alyson Richman                  M.J. Rose

Alyson Richman's latest novel is The Garden of Letters. She is the author of Greenwich Library book group favorite, The Lost Wife, the tale of a husband and wife who are separated in a concentration camp during World War II and reunited 60 years later at their grandchildren's wedding. 

.J. Rose grew up haunting the galleries of the Metropolitan Museum and the lush gardens of Central Park. She is the author of more than a dozen novels, the founder of AuthorBuzz.com, and lives in Greenwich, CT. 

Alyson Richman graduated from Wellesley College with a degree in art history and is a former Thomas J. Watson fellow. Art features prominently in many of her books. She lives with her family in Long Island, New York. 

AuthorsLive@GreenwichLibrary is made possible through the support of the Greenwich Library Board of Trustees and contributions by generous donors. Books will be available for purchase and signing through Diane's Books. This series is open to all at no charge, but seating in the Meeting Room is limited and will be available on a first come, first served basis. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. 

For more information call Marianne Weill at 203-622-7933 or visit www.greenwichlibrary.org/authorslive.

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SCORE: Content Marketing Workshop on 4/22

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On Wednesday, April 22 from 6-8 pm, SCORE of Fairfield County will host a workshop on Content Marketing in the Greenwich Library Meeting Room.

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The technique of Content Marketing has emerged out of the transition from traditional media to the digital marketing world. More than just creating content on the internet to promote a product or service, businesses are discovering there is value in the content itself. This content can go out via a website, in email marketing, online articles and documents, downloadable white papers, posts and articles on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest and video channels like YouTube, as well as games, pictures, music, sounds and software. 

This workshop will focus on how to evaluate your existing content, how to craft new content (including powerful business writing), and how to ensure your content marketing will produce results for your business. Registration starts at 5:30 pm, program at 6 pm.

Presenter: Deirdre Silberstein, President, Silberstein & Associates LLC, a business writing and publishing consulting firm.
Moderator: Jeff Seaver, owner, Seaver Interactive, a website design and internet marketing firm. 

Contact SCORE Fairfield County for more information or to register.

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The Technology Training Center presents a series of one hour workshops this March highlighting the wide-ranging capabilities of and applications for ReferenceUSA, a database of searchable consumer and business information. The Center will also offer classes on iDevice Photography, MOOCs, and more. All year long, Greenwich Library training staff is available to help you explore new technologies and develop the skills you need to make your online life more productive and enjoyable. Classes are offered in a comfortable environment for all participants, regardless of level, and are open to the public at no charge. 

Tuesday, March 3 at 3 p.m., ReferenceUSA: Consumer and Lifestyle Data 
Ever wonder how marketers and advertisers target specific messages to you? Find out how to access the same type of data for your neighborhood or city. Anyone who is interested in understanding the purchase preferences of a community will find this data both interesting and informative. Learn how to navigate this area of ReferenceUSA and apply the data to your needs. 

Wednesday, March 4 at 11 a.m., Trending Monthly TV: How to Cut the Cable Cord 
Learn how streaming and subscription services and even a TV antenna could help you cut the cord. Trending Monthly is a new program designed to improve quality of life by introducing and demonstrating what's hot and trending in technology - ranging from productivity, personal and family use, safety and security. Instructor, Lance Pendleton, Director of Education, MacInspires. 

Thursday, March 5 at 6:30 to 8 p.m., Introduction to Social Media for Small Business ***CANCELLED DUE TO SNOW - RESCHEDULED FOR APRIL 13
We'll review the primary social media channels used by small business for their online marketing efforts, cover the attributes of each, and discuss how to decide if it is right for you. Plus, we'll tie in some email best practices as well. This program is co-sponsored with the Peterson Business Programs and presented by Robert Clark, LucidPointe.com. 

Sunday, March 8 at 2 p.m., Teen Tech Week: Intro to Python 
To kick off Teen Tech Week at the Library, the Student Leadership Council will host a brief, one hour introduction to the Python programming language for students in grades 7-12. Sponsored by Teen Services. Please register using the Library's online calendar. 

Monday, March 16 at 2 p.m., Intro to MOOCs 
What are MOOCs? MOOC stands for Massively Open Online Course. MOOCs are free courses that are delivered electronically to huge audiences via the Internet. We'll look at online courses offered through Coursera, an education platform that partners with top universities and organizations worldwide to facilitate their free courses. 

Monday, March 16 at 3 p.m., ReferenceUSA: Start, Manage and Grow Your Business 
Entrepreneurs and business owners will learn how to use ReferenceUSA to find the mission critical information necessary to start, manage and grow a business. Topics include: name search for business, locating vendors, finding investors, community demographics, competitive analysis and much more. 

Tuesday, March 17 at 3 p.m., ReferenceUSA: Big Data and Mapping 
Data visualization is the next BIG thing in data. Going beyond static lists of information, ReferenceUSA can help you visualize data elements on a map. Great for understanding how locations relate to each other or seeing densities within a specific area, ReferenceUSA mapping tools give you a new and powerful way to understand the business landscape. 

Wednesday, March 18 at 11 a.m., Taking Pictures with your iPhone or iPad 
Learn the ins and outs of photography with your iDevices. This class will cover how to use the iPhone/iPad camera, helpful apps, best practices and tips and tricks for maximizing your photography or video with a mobile device. 

Wednesday, March 18 at 3 p.m., ReferenceUSA: Uncovering the Hidden Job Market, Search Strategies 
Attendees will learn how to use ReferenceUSA to find accurate information for applications and resumes and engaging cover letters; to assemble a network of references and referrers and to find key individuals within a business. ReferenceUSA can also be used to research and prepare for interviews and other interactions. We will also introduce and explore the new Jobs & Internship module. 

Friday, March 20 at 2 p.m., Basic Computing 
In this class we will first assess the needs of attendees, then review basic computer and Internet use including search, email, creating documents and file management. Newbies welcome! 

Wednesday, March 25 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., Career Coach: Microsoft PowerPoint  **rescheduled from March 11
Sponsored by Southwestern CTWorks, the Career Coach is offering two, 2-hour Microsoft PowerPoint training sessions. Level 1 training is at 10 am and level 2 at 1 pm. The Coach bus is fully equipped with 10 PC work stations and Internet access and is parked outside the Library's West Putnam Avenue entrance. Arrive early to sign-up.

Regular Library Technology Training Center Programming 
Every Saturday in March from 1 to 1:30 p.m., students can attend Volunteer Orientation for Tech Support positions. The Library's regular Drop-in Computer Lab is offered three times each week: on Saturdays and Tuesdays at 11 a.m., and Thursdays at 3 p.m., from March 3-28 (no lab March 31). Get hands-on assistance with new gadgets, downloading eBooks and audiobooks using OverDrive, Library databases, Microsoft Office, Internet search, email, online forms, social media, job search, basic computing and more with Library staff. Use your own device or practice with ours. 

For more information email Training Center staff, call (203) 625-6508, or visit www.greenwichlibrary.org/TechnologyTrainingCenter.aspx.

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Suggest a Book for Greenwich Reads Together 2015

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Greenwich Reads Together is a community-wide reading experience which will engage all of Greenwich in exploring a single book. What do you think we should read next? Suggest a book by clicking here

 

In order to be selected, the book should be of high literary quality, reflective of universal issues and capable of generating thought-provoking discussions. It should lend itself to engaging public programs and appeal to a diverse population. It must also be currently in print and available in large quantities and in multiple formats, including paperback, ebook, audiobook and large print. The suggestions will be evaluated by a committee that includes Library staff and community members. The chosen book will be announced later this spring.


Greenwich Reads Together 2015 will take place this Fall. For more information about Greenwich Reads Together, please click here


Book Suggestions

Click for availability and more information Mayflower A Story of Courage, Community, and War, by Nathaniel Philbrick
 
From Amazon: "A fresh and extraordinarily vivid account of our most sacred national myth: the voyage of the Mayflower and the settlement of Plymouth Colony." Critically acclaimed; appropriate for adults and students.
-Judy Sgammato


Click for availability and more information All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
 
A stunningly ambitious and beautiful novel about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II.
-Judy Sgammato



Click for availability and more information The Room, by Jonas Karlsson
 
Karlsson sets up a brilliant clash between genius and the pressures of social conformity. At what point do we decide to put the brakes on a person's productivity in order to suit the psychological comfort level of those around them? How much quirkiness are we willing to tolerate in those responsible for advancing our society as a whole? I found this story humorous, at times dark, and very thought-provoking.
-Will


Click for availability and more information All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
 
Amazon: "Does the world need yet another novel about WWII? It does when the novel is as inventive and beautiful as this one by Anthony Doerr. In fact, All the Light We Cannot See--while set mostly in Germany and France before and during the war--is not really a ?war novel?. Yes, there is fear and fighting and disappearance and death, but the author?s focus is on the interior lives of his two characters. Marie Laure is a blind 14-year-old French girl who flees to the countryside when her father disappears from Nazi-occupied Paris. Werner is a gadget-obsessed German orphan whose skills admit him to a brutal branch of Hitler Youth. Never mind that their paths don?t cross until very late in the novel, this is not a book you read for plot (although there is a wonderful, mysterious subplot about a stolen gem). This is a book you read for the beauty of Doerr?s writing-- ?Abyss in her gut, desert in her throat, Marie-Laure takes one of the cans of food??--and for the way he understands and cherishes the magical obsessions of childhood. Marie Laure and Werner are never quaint or twee. Instead they are powerful examples of the way average people in trying times must decide daily between morality and survival.
-Caroline Dunn



Click for availability and more information The Devil and Miss Prym, by Paulo Coelho
 
A community devoured by greed, cowardice, and fear. A man persecuted by the ghosts of his painful past. A young woman searching for happiness. In one eventful week, each will face questions of life, death, and power, and each will choose a path. Will they choose good or evil?
-Zoe Hedstrom


Click for availability and more information The Orphan Master's Son, by Adam Johnson
 
Present day North Korea. The brilliantly written story that takes the reader from the country to the capital.


-Nicole Smith


Click for availability and more information Fahrenheit 451 , by Ray Bradbury
 
It is a classic book about how important it is to read.



-Charlotte


Click for availability and more information Where the Red Fern Grows, by Wilson Rawls
 
While this is a children's novel, it can also appeal to adults. Everyone has their own "favorites", and Where the Red Fern Grows usually pops up on that list. The plot and the message behind the book is universal.
-Annie


Click for availability and more information Americanah, by Chimamandah Ngozi Adichie
 

very interesting, timely and incredible read. opened my eyes...


-Sherrill Kellam



Click for availability and more information The Rainy Season: Three Lives in the New South Africa, by Maggie Messitt
 
The Rainy Season tells the stories of three generations in the Rainbow Nation one decade after its first democratic elections. This multi-threaded narrative follows Regina, a tapestry weaver in her sixties, standing at the crossroads where her Catholic faith and the AIDS pandemic crash; Thoko, a middle-aged sangoma (traditional healer) taking steps to turn her shebeen (a backdoor illegal pub) into a fully licensed tavern; and Dankie, a young man taking his matriculation exams, coming of age as one of Mandela's Children, the first academic class educated entirely under democratic governance. The Rainy Season introduces readers to the remote bushveld community of Rooiboklaagte, near the international tourist destination of Kruger National Park and Africa's most expensive safari destinations and opens a window into the beautifully complicated reality of daily life in South Africa. While this is authentically a story about a particular time and place, this is also a story with universal themes of hope and fear, love and loss, a reflection of the past and questions about the future. Adam Hochschild, award-winning author of King Leopold's Ghost, Bury the Chains, and To End All Wars, describes Messitt's debut book of narrative nonfiction as follows: "Whether safari travelogues or tributes to the legacy of Nelson Mandela, what most Americans read about South Africa is far more superficial than Maggie Messitt's gritty vision of the country. In the tradition of writers like James Agee and Katherine Boo, she has immersed herself deeply in the everyday lives of people struggling with AIDS, early death, corruption, false promises, grinding rural poverty, and the daily struggle to make ends meet in a society that tourists and most foreign correspondents never see. This is a profoundly compassionate book that truly takes you inside the lives of those in it."

Ultimately, this is a book about three unique people and a country with whom you'll connect on many levels. I think it's a great pick for both high school students and adults across Greenwich, inciting conversations around community, poverty, gender, government assistance, indigenous cultures, religion, entrepreneurship, and the challenges and successes faced by everyday people inside newly democratized nations. Messitt, an emerging voice in literary journalism, was recently named a Kenyon Review Peter Taylor Fellow by Kenyon College, awarded a Carnegie Scholar and Writer-in-Residence at Elizabethtown College (PA), and recognized by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies for her work on The Rainy Season. Also, the author has a local connection and I'm confident we would be able to secure her to visit the library, book clubs, schools, and possibly even lead workshops throughout the year.
-Joe De Muyt


Click for availability and more information We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves , by Karen Joy Fowler
 

It's well written and the topic is one that has not been addressed previously in GRT.

-Pat Nelson



Click for availability and more information Dubliners, by James Joyce
 
"Dubliners," a book of short stories, relates to numerous contemporary issues: family relationships, addictions, religious beliefs, marriage, honesty and interpersonal considerations. The book is accessible to average readers and is pertinent to age groups ranging from pre-teens to seniors. The book contains "The Dead," widely considered as one of the greatest short stories ever written. "Dubliners" easily ties-in with a host of events: films have been made of several of the stories; live performances may encompass a trove of music represented in the book; dining representations are apparent in the work; lecture possibilities include views of Joyce's work, the impact of his career and other issues encompassing a range of subjects from -- for example -- immigration practices to aspects of English Literature. Testifying to its continued universal appeal, "Dubliners" -- 204 pages covering 15 short stories -- was published roughly 100 years ago, it has never been out-of-print.
-Jesse Meyers


Click for availability and more information The World According to Garp, by John Irving
 
This modern classic was written in 1978, but deals with very relevant issues of today - finding one's true self, gay and womens' rights -it's touching, heartbreaking, hilarious AND it would be amazing to get John Irving to come to the Greenwich Library!
-R.T.


Click for availability and more information Truth Be Told: Adam Becomes Audrey, by Alexandra Bogdanovic
 
Written by Byram resident Alexandra Bogdanovic, this gripping memoir has received recognition as a finalist in the 2014 National Indie Excellence Awards competition's LGBT Non-Fiction Category; and as winner in the 2013 New England Book Festival's Gay Literature Category. In it, Bogdanovic recounts in vivid detail how she met, fell in love with and married the man of her dreams, how she learned that he self-identified as and planned to "become" a woman, and what happened after she learned the truth. At a time when transgender issues garner national media attention, the author, an award-winning journalist who grew up in Greenwich, felt it was critical to share another side of the story. "I am not a celebrity. I am just an ordinary woman who was forced to confront and cope with extraordinary circumstances," Bogdanovic says. "Just because I am not Kris Jenner does not make my story less important." Hailed as a compelling read, "Truth" is sure to generate timely and meaningful conversation.
-Alexandra Bogdanovic


Click for availability and more information In the Garden of Beasts : Love, Terror, and An American Family in Hitler's Berlin, by Erik Larsen

Brings a terrifying time in history vividly to life. 

-Larry Wentz



Click for availability and more information The Sea, by John Banville
 
Beautifully woven tapestry of language, deeply atmospheric, a gradual exposure of the protagonist's authentic self. I listened to this book on audiobook upon finishing the hard copy, just for the pleasure of listening to the language, and picked up various clues and revelations of fact that I had previously missed. A good book for discussion and disection, life situations with which most people would identify or sympathize or empathize with. Magnificent.
-Margot Meehan


Click for availability and more information My Promised Land : the Triumph and Tragedy of Israel, by Ari Shavit
 
My recommendation, although the subject is political in nature, is a superb book, "My Promised Land" by Avi Shavit. The author is unusually empathetic to all sides, including those who are antithetically opposed to his personal point of view.
-George Ubogy


Click for availability and more information Mountains Beyond Mountains, by Tracy Kidder
 
Terrific book about Paul Farmer, who is a doctor, and so much more, giving to the community in Haiti and Boston, and developing novel ways to deliver health care to those in need. Excellent, clear writing by Kidder.
-Chuck


Click for availability and more information The Color of Water A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother, by James McBride
 
Although this book was published in 1996, it is very relevant for today, covering issues of race, religion and identity. James McBride won the National Book Award for his "The Good Lord Bird" in 2013.
-R.T.


Click for availability and more information The Martian, by Andy Weir
 
The book was originally published as a serial on the author's website. After becoming a very popular kindle download it was picked up by a publisher. So it's an interesting way to write a book which could tie into the schools, where students at different levels could try their hand at writing short serials of a story they develop. There could be a tie-in with the Bowman Observatory in town to bring people to a little-used resource that could teach about astronomy. Survival skills courses at Camp Seton Boy Scout Reservation? Math and science teachers would love it-they could develop all sorts of lessons from the book. Garden Education Center and garden clubs on the botany aspects of the book. I can see a lot of interesting organizations that one would not necessarily think of coming together to be involved in this. An overnight for groups "stranded" on Captain's Island? Each group with set tasks and supplies. That's just a start, I'm sure there's lots more in there.
-Beth Boyar


Click for availability and more information All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
 
Inspiring and unforgettable situations and characters. The radiance and grace of the human soul. The utter stupidity and waste of war.

-Barbara Stephens


Click for availability and more information Mary Coin, by Marisa Silver
 
See the New York Times review here. Much to discuss - history/photography/the passage of time/multi-generations. It's beautifully written and there is a lot of extra-curricular material - both visual and written.
-Rosanna Nissen


Click for availability and more information Unbroken : A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption, by Laura Hillenbrand
 
A real (non-fiction) page-turner that tells an unforgettable story of a man's journey into extremity, and it is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit.
-Sheila Carstensen



Click for availability and more information Dead Wake The Last Crossing of the Lusitania, by Erik Larsen
 

-Robin Lescott




Click for availability and more information Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline
 
An excellent choice is Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. This was recommended by AITE in Stamford, the entire staff and school read it, and so did many parents, who all seemed to agree it was timely and so well-done. I am a former high school English teacher and think this book was one of the most fabulous ones I'd read in a while, especially in terms of connecting generations. It is very different from the ones GRT usually does, but I think it would be a big hit among Greenwich readers, both young and old.
-Lisa Johnson



Click for availability and more information To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
 
We read it in New Canaan when I grew up (eons ago), and we still discuss how much it was a positive experience for our lives.
-Dr Susan Santry



Click for availability and more information Childhood's End, by Arthur C. Clarke
 
My suggestion is Arthur C. Clarke's Childhood's End. I'm now reading it for the fourth time. It fills all the criteria you've set but one (possibly two). The first is the idea of appealing to a diverse population. Being SciFi many people will immediately discount it for that reason alone no matter how good the book may be. Second I don't know if it's available in large print. It is available in every other format.
-Bill Buschel



Click for availability and more information The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin
 

-Robert Sheridan




Click for availability and more information All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
 
Although very popular at the moment, I think it has the universal appeal to be a Greenwich Reads choice. First of all, it is beautifully written literary fiction. It explores experiences and relationships for two young people, in France and Germany, during WW II. The plot is highly original as well as historical and will prompt discussion for several generations.
-Martha Zoubek



Click for availability and more information All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
 
It is a window into our history, a story told beautifully, with engaging characters. It lends itself to discussion on many levels, and it is most enjoyable to read. It is my favorite book of the last many months.
-Denny Elliot



Click for availability and more information All the Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr
 
It's a great read. It makes relatively recent history tactile. It specifically demonstrates how people can become trained not to feel, something that is happening in politics now in this country.
-C F Byers



Click for availability and more information Me Before You, by Jojo Moyes
 
It's a good read. For the first time when reading about a character that demonstrates no confidence, the author allowed me to enter her experience so I did not need to judge. I could feel it, and could feel her emergence from that state. In this community there are many who are raised with such privilege, often displaying confidence they have no right to.
-Candace Byers


Click for availability and more information The Winthrop Woman, by Anya Seton
 
A wonderful fictionalized history of the founding of New England and Greenwich. Anya Seton, who died in 1990, was a Greenwich resident and the daughter of Ernest Thompson Seton. This would be a good book to read for Greenwich's 375th anniversary.
-Edith Wilson


Click for availability and more information Behind the Beautiful Forevers : Life, Death, and Hope in A Mumbai Undercity , by Katherine Boo
 
It is a beautifully written depiction of stunningly desperate poverty that exists and yet is difficult to imagine. It does a great job of rendering almost tangible our distant and abstract sense of what poverty really is.
-Robert Rout


Click for availability and more information Americanah , by Chimamandah Ngozi Adichie
 
Adichie addresses race/white privilege/SES directly as she chronicles a woman's Nigerian youth, passionate love, and immigrant experience in America. The likable protagonist, Ifemulu writes a blog that attends to important issues in our country.
-Kimberly Steinhorn


Click for availability and more information Deep Down Dark The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in A Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free, by Hector Tobar
 
Lots to discuss - survival, human interest, salvation, community/country support, universal themes, beautifully written
-Barbara Arenz


Click for availability and more information The Book of Unknown Americans, by **Cristina Henriquez**
 
Cristina Henriquez is a beautiful writer and this story about new immigrants settling on the eastern coast of the United States is one that is both current in its theme and personal in its approach. Individual stories are told in the first person and are skillfully woven together to highlight a love story between the teenaged children of two of the families, the Toros and the Riveras. As we peek into the lives of these immigrants we sense their isolation along with a desire to belong, their efforts to master the intricacies of English while retaining the beauty of their native language, the need to embrace a new culture while holding on to the traditions they grew up with, and the absolute confusion that often permeates their daily lives. "We are the unknown Americans, the ones nobody even wants to know, because they've been told to be scared of us and because maybe if they did take the time to get to know us, they'd find that we're not that bad, and maybe even find out that we're a lot like them." Ms. Henriquez has won many awards and has received many accolades for this book and her past works. You can find out more about her at cristinahenriquez.com. Disclaimer: I am a friend of both Cristina and her parents.
-Andrea DeBergalis


Click for availability and more information Dead Wake The Last Crossing of the Lusitania, by Erik Larsen
 
I suggest Dead Wake, by Erik Larson, the story of the sinking of the Lusitania. This year is the 100th anniversary of the tragedy. I have read several of Larson's books, including The Devil in the White City, and find his work well researched and eminently readable.
-Penelope Pappas



Click for availability and more information To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
 
I would suggest "To Kill a Mocking Bird". It is a good time for all of us to be aware of racial tension.
-Lilly D'Angelo



Click for availability and more information Until Tuesday A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him, by Luis Carlos Montalvan
 
A wonderfully moving book, Until Tuesday is Montalvan's personal story of being seriously injured while serving in the Iraq war and his subsequent recovery. His severe post-traumatic stress left him debilitated and disparate to resume a normal life. Through a chance suggestion by a fellow veteran, he becomes aware of an organization that matches dogs who are specifically trained to aid veterans like Montalvan. Thus Tuesday, a gorgeous golden retriever, enters his life. Their story makes for terrific reading as Tuesday enables Montalvan to regain his life. Montalvan also wrote Tuesday Tucks Me In specifically for children and it would be a perfect companion book for younger readers. Until Tuesday offers many elements for interesting programming for Greenwich Reads.
-Roy Brayton


Click for availability and more information The Remains of the Day, by Kazuo Ishiguro
 
Awarded the Man Booker Prize for fiction in 1989, this novel offers thought provoking ideas for all ages, allowing readers to discover new nuances and angles in the book at different stages in their own lives. Through a mix of flashbacks and ?present time? political and personal events, Ishiguro develops the complex inner world of an aging butler and his sometimes contradictory actions in service of a "great man." Looking at the individual as well as the community, he presents nuanced examinations of dignity, competing definitions of professionalism, sources of self-worth, and the value in human warmth, love, loyalty, and memory. This novel offers much fodder for reflection as a community as it challenges assumptions about what makes a life well lived, and what makes a life well lived *together*.
-Rita Trivedi


Click for availability and more information On Immunity: An Inoculation, by Eula Biss
 
Great book that discusses vaccines, false information, and how parents try to care for their children in the world filled with too much information. Deals with recent events of the measles outbreak as well as the constant issues of where we source our information from. Modern topic that relates to children and adult.
-Jon


Click for availability and more information Toms River A Small Town, A Cancer Cluster, and the Epic Quest to Expose Pollution's Hidden Consequences, by Dan Fagin
 
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Winner of The New York Public Library's Helen Bernstein Book Award. "A new classic of science reporting" The New York Times. Current affair that deals with politics, our environment and somewhat local issues. Will be a good source of discussion of CT polluted rivers, save the sound organizations, as well as presidential candidates, NJ, and their role in environmental preservation.
-Dulce Stanton


Click for availability and more information The Monuments Men Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves, and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, by Robert M. Edsel
 
The previously untold story of a little-known WWII Allied division whose mission was to track down European art and treasures that had been looted by the Nazis at Hitler's command.
-Barbara


Click for availability and more information Saving Italy The Race to Rescue A Nation's Treasures From the Nazis, by Robert M. Edsel
 
When Hitler's armies occupied Italy in 1943, they also seized control of mankind's greatest cultural treasures. As they had done throughout Europe, the Nazis could now plunder the masterpieces of the Renaissance, the treasures of the Vatican, and the antiquities of the Roman Empire. In May 1944 two unlikely American heroes--artist Deane Keller and scholar Fred Hartt--embarked from Naples on the treasure hunt of a lifetime, tracking billions of dollars of missing art, including works by Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Caravaggio, and Botticell.
-Barbara


Click for availability and more information Ghost Boy The Miraculous Escape of A Misdiagnosed Boy Trapped Inside His Own Body, by Martin Pistorius
 
How this remarkable young man overcame his illness and returned from his illness to lead a normal and productive life.
-Joan Eaton



Click for availability and more information The Tragic Age, by Steve Metcalfe
 
This is a great novel by a new author that I believe many parents and teenagers in Greenwich will be able to relate to in many ways. It is insightful, hard hitting and true to today's lifestyles and values. A great read, it is being called a modern day version of "Catcher in the Rye" and is an ideal candidate for a book to be read together and discussed at length.
-Kevin Coyner


Click for availability and more information I Am Malala: the Story of the Girl Who Stood up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban, by Malala Yousafzai
 
This is a story of boundless hope and promise and courage. It provides insight to the workings of the destructive forces of the Taliban and also of the way the US is seen by the people. Outstanding for all ages.
-Pam Sloane


Click for availability and more information Shadow, by Michael Morpurgo
 
This is a amazing book because it talks about a bond between a dog named Shadow and a boy named Aman. This book can bring a lot of questions and thought to your mind.
-Noemy Sigua



Click for availability and more information The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
 
This book has a lot of action and it will keep you reading more and more.
-Noemy Sigua




Click for availability and more information The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, by Walter Isaacson
 
Each chapter of this engaging history focuses on a different digital technology and the collaborators who made it happen The topics include The Computer, Programming, the Transistor, The Microchip, Video Games, The Internet, The PC, Software, Online, and the Web. The innovators are names known and unknown ranging from Babbage to Cerf to Gates and Jobs. Isaacson's easy to read writing style makes the 500 pages speed by. The chapter topics lend themselves to speakers with special expertise or a forum about the future of digital content. The subject matter is different than any addressed by Greenwich Reads Together thus far and underscores the growing interest in STEM ( science, technology, engineering, math). For example, the introduction and final chapter focus on Ada Lovelace (daughter of Lord Byron) who pioneered programming in the 1840's. An equally compelling account of scientific accomplishments spurred on by the collaboration of scientists across many disciplines is The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation, a 2012 title cited by Isaacson.
-Greenwich Reader


Click for availability and more information Wolf Hall, by Hilary Mantel
 
This inside look at the Tudor's and King Henry's advisors, Cromwell and More is dense but delicious in how devious, cunning and conniving they were. It will make you stop watching House of Cards on Netflix, it really is better!
-Teresa Ginsberg


Click for availability and more information The Innocents Abroad, by Mark Twain
 
This is one of the most popular travel books ever written. It transformed an obscure Western journalist into a national celebrity. Hilarious blend of comedy,travel guide and stinging satire.
-Mary Cuff


Click for availability and more information Just Mercy A Story of Justice and Redemption, by Bryan Stevenson
 
This is a book that deserves a wider audience. Written by Harvard educated Stevenson who is also a MacArthur grant recipient, it chronicles his own experience advocating for the poor and oppressed in the criminal justice system in Alabama. While a student at Harvard Law School, Stevenson completed an internship at the Atlanta-based Southern Prisoners Defense Committee. His work there motivated him to start the Equal Justice Initiative in 1989. The book describes his experience representing many individuals who had been unjustly accused and imprisoned and tells in detail about Walter McMillan who was wrongfully convicted and served six years on death row. This would be a good discussion starter for community conversations.
-Karen Harris


Click for availability and more information Lunch Money, by Andrew Clements
 
It is a good book because, the book is like a fun/action book for kids to read and for their parents to read. So there is a boy and a girl who have a fight on who could find the easiest ways to make money and both of them win becuase they have really good ideas and they are smart kids.
-Michael J. Marullo

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