Historical Happenings

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Bates-Scofield House Museum
Tue-Thu: 12 to 5 PM - Sun: 12 to3
45 Old Kings Highway North - Darien

The Bates-Scofield House is home to the Darien Historical Society,
and houses valuable local history resources.  Also includes an exhibit
of 18th century clothing.  Donations requested. Call 203-655-9233


Holiday Train Express Show
Weekdays: 10 am to 4 PM   Weekends: 11 AM to 1 PM
Fairfield Museum and History Center
370 Beach Road - Fairfield CT 06824

"The entire family will enjoy this exhibit of model trains winding
around a winter wonderland of spectacular trees and beautiful
holiday scenery."  Fee required.  Call 203-259-1598.


Father of the Postage Meter

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I often look at "Greenwich Before 2000" (GHS) to get ideas for topics to discuss on this blog.  Recently, I was surprised to read that Arthur Pitney - inventor of the postage meter - lived in Cos Cob in 1921.  The book also mentioned that his partner, B.H. Bowes, was also a resident of Greenwich.   I knew that the Pitney-Bowes Company had an office in Stamford, but had no idea the business partners were local residents.

Arthur Pitney was born in Quincy, Illinois, in 1871.  In 1890, his family moved to Chicago.  It was here in 1893 that young Arthur toured the World's Columbian Exposition, and became very interested in mechanical inventions.  This would prove to be very useful in the future.

While working in a wallpaper store, Arthur thought there had to be a better way to attach postage to the hundreds of letters the store sent out to customers.  He felt the manual process was wasteful in terms of time and money.  Being interested in mechanical invenrions, he created a machine to simplify business mailing.  Arthur built the first postage meter with a manual crank, chain, printing die, counter and lockout device. In 1902, he founded the Pitney Postal Machine Company.  By 1912, it was renamed the American Postage Meter Company.

Pitney056.jpg

Unfortunately, Pitney wasn't much of a marketer.  He had spent $90,000 of his own money on this device, but got little interest from the Post Office Department.  His patent was expiring and he had little to show for his investment.  Not only did his finances suffer, but his marriage was ruined.  He decided to abandon the project, and resorted to selling insurance.  Fortunately, someone introduced him to Walter Bowes in 1919. 

Walter Bowes was born in England in 1882.  His family immigrated to the United States. By 1908, he was selling check endorsing machines to automate processing, and eventually bought the Universal Stamping Company.  He started renting stamp cancelling machines to the Post Office Department, and promoted permit printing.  Bowes moved his operation to Stamford in 1917. 

Bowes believed postage stamps would become obsolete.  He thought automation was the way to go.  During a discussion with a Postal official, the suggestion was made that he contact Arthur Pitney.  Pitney was good at manufacturing, and Bowes was great at marketing.  By 1920, the two formed the Pitney-Bowes Postage Meter Company.  In September, the Post Office approved the purchase of their Model M Postage Meter Company.  This device improved the mailing process tremendously by affixing postage to great volumes of mail at high speed.  A main manufacturing office was opened in Stamford, and by 1922, there were branch offices in 12 major American cities as well as Canada and England.  Corporations saw the promise of these machines, and started placing orders.  Pitney-Bowes became a rousing success. 

Boweas058.jpg

Despite the success, Pitney and Bowes had personal issues, and Arthur Pitney resigned in 1924 after a dispute with Walter Bowes.  Three years later, he had a stroke and in 1933, he passed away at the age of 62.  Bowes was not very disciplined.  He hated working in the office, and preferred to sail his boat.  Bowes retired in 1940, and his stepson, Walter Wheeler, took over.  Bowes died in 1957 at the age of 75.

The company flourished from 1930 to 1960 under the leadership of Bowes and Walter Wheeler.  In 1950, the company went public with its stock.  Pitney-Bowes acquired the Monarch Marking System Company - creator of the retail barcode - in 1960.  The decade from 1970 to 1980 saw great expansion, and in 1976 the Pitney-Bowes Credit Corporation was created to offer financing options to PB customers.  The company entered the office copy machine an FAX market.  PB also acquired the dictation machine giant Dictaphone.  In 1990, the company began manufacturing barcode printers.  By 2000, Pitney-Bowes had invested a total of $2.5 billion in making 83 acquisitions!

Perhaps as a cost-cutting measure, Pitney-Bowes sold its World Headquarters in Stamford and moved to 3001 Summer Street in 2014.  Otherwise, it appears to be flourishing as the economy appears to rebound.  If it continues to be on "the cutting edge" of changing technology, it should thrive for years to come.

It's hard to imagine what the world would be like today without the Pitney-Bowes postage meter and business systems.  Pitney and Bowes represent the best in business innovation.


SOURCE

The Funding Universe: Pitney-Bowes Inc. History, n.d.: Online website: Accessed 12/12/2014.

http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/pitney-bowes-inc-history/



Early Thanksgiving in Greenwich

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I decided to research what Thanksgiving was like when the Town was first founded.  As you know, Greenwich was founded in 1640, twenty years after Plymouth Colony (1620).  We've all heard strories about the first Thanksgiving in Plymouth.  They had a huge feast and invited the Native Americans to join them.  So I thought the same would have happened here.  I couldn't find any information on a similar feast here in Greenwich.  This might not be as strange as you may first think. 

Mead notes in "Ye Historie of Ye Town of Greenwich" that our settlers had left the Massachusetts Bay Colony to escape the rigors of Puritanism.  Perhaps they rejected the customs or traditions observed in Plymouth. Maybe they wanted to start their own tradtions.  Mead also noted that Greenwich was considered a wild and lawless town.  People did pretty much what they wanted.

Looking back at the 1640 time period, one thing that really sticks out is the deteriorating relations with the Native Americans.  Captain Patrick and Robert Feake had purchased land in what is now Old Greenwich for 24 fur coats. (Some reports say the natives were never paid in full!)  Maybe the Native Americans meant to share the land and not give it entirely away.  There were reports of the English using liquor to get them drunk so they could cheat them from their property.  Once the Indians figured out the trickery, they retaliated.  In 1642, Cornelius Labden was killed by the local Indians, and the next year Captain Patrick killed sachem (chief) Mayn Mianos. The worst incident happened in 1644 when Captain John Underhill led 130 Dutch and English in a massacre at an Indian settlement at Strickland Plains.  It was reported that 800 to 1,000 Native Americans were killed near Cos Cob.   Eventually, most of eastern Connecticut and southeastern Massachusetts would be involved in King Phillips War.  There was definite tension between the Colonists and the Native Americans.

Local newspapers started in 1877, so there are no newspaper accounts of early Thanksgiving celebrations.  However, Mrs. A. C. Lowitz, wife of the president of the Historical Society, gave an interview to the Greenwich Time on what an early Thanksgiving feast could have contained.  It was published on November 24, 1965. In the seventeenth century, women would start preparing several days before the celebration.  Residents relied heavily on home-grown foods.  A favorite was Dutch Oven "Pye".  This could be made from woodcock, grouse, partridge or chickens.  Wild turkey might be served with oyster stuffing.  Baked lobster was no doubt on the menu due to our proximity to Long Island Sound.  Roasted meat or fowl might be served with homemade bread. (The Bush Holley House had a great fireplace and beehive oven for baking.)  Pumpkin fritters (similar to hush puppies) would be served, as well as turnips and carrots glazed with maple syrup or honey.  Indian pudding was served for dessert. 

thanksgiving.jpg

Expanding on this thought, I believe local residents would feast on their home-grown agricultural products including apples, pears, peaches, potatoes, vegetables, poultry, sheep, pigs and dairy products.  Dumplings were popular (Dumpling Pond?) as well as shellfish such as oysters, clams and mussels. 

I would like to add that, since Greenwich was located on the main Post Road to Boston, travellers might enjoy a Thanksgiving meal at one of the many taverns in town.  And once Greenwich became a summer resort of sorts during the 1800s, they might choose to spend the holidays in town.  Ferry service probably brought people and supplies in for Thanksgiving.  Stores on Greenwich Avenue would stock up on dry goods in anticipation of the holiday.  Since churches were the main social centers for outlying villages such as Stanwich,  Round Hill and Banksville, people might share their Thanksgiving dinners there.  Specific ethnic groups (Italians, Polish, Dutch) might bring their own traditions to the community.

Today, many residents observe Thanksgiving in a different way.  Family members travel great distances to share a meal.  Some attend church services.  The Greenwich High School football game has become a Thanksgiving tradition.  Stamford has been holding a parade (usually the Sunday before) for over 20 years now.  Various groups volunteer at soup kitchens or donate food for the less fortunate.  Others have invited people, who would otherwise be alone, to share their Thanksgiving meal.  Until recently, local churches  held a Union (Ecumenical) Service. 

My family had our own tradtioins.  We would go to the local high school football game, then come home and watch the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.  Dad would carve the turkey.   One of us would take a turn saying grace.  During dessert, we would each name something we were thankful for.  Dad and I would play chess after the meal.  Someone would call long distance to relatives that couldn't be with us.  And the wishbone was removed so it could dry and be pulled in a few days.

Whatever your personal family Thanksgiving traditions, may you and your family have many blessings in life.  And may you end up with the longest part of the wishbone!

Have a Joyous and Happy Thanksgiving!


SOURCE

The Greenwich Time


 

 

Historical Happenings

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Greenwich Faces the Great War
Now Through March 22, 2015
Bush Holley House
Srtickland Road - Cos Cob

The Historical Society has assembled a multimedia exhibit
of photos, newspapers and warttime letters.  Also includes
a state-of-the-art touchscreen experience.  Call 869-6899
for more details!


Bush Holley House By Candlelight
Sunday - December 14 - 5 to 7 PM
Bush Holley Site - Cos Cob

A family favorite!  Come see how the historic house
was decorated for the holidays.  Free.



Civic - Minded William E. Hall

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Many important and influential people have made Greenwich their home over the years. This is no doubt due to the proximity of New York City as well as our beautiful countryside.  One of these people was lawyer and business executive William Edwin Hall.

Mr. Hall was born in St. Mary's, Pennsylvania, on March 25, 1878.  His father was involved in a number of industries including lumber, coal, natural gas, public utilities and banking.  He attended Haverford and Lawrenceville schools preparing for college.  In 1900,  he received a PhD from Yale, and in 1903,  a LLB from Harvard.  After college, he was a member of several law firms.  A former Justice of the Supreme Court, the Honorable Martin L. Stover, was a senior partner at one firm.  William became  head of the Hall, Cunningham and Haywood law firm in New York City.

William Hall served on a number of corporate boards including the Trojan Powder Company, the Duriron Company, St Mary's National Bank, Speer Carbon Company, International Graphite and Electrode Company, Greenwich Trust and a host of others. No doubt his legal expertise was invaluable, and he was held in great esteem. When the war broke out in 1914, he served on the Commission for Relief in Belgium under Herbert Hoover.

Mr. Hall devoted a good part of his life to helping underpriveleged boys.  He became president of the Boys Clubs of America in 1916.  This included 350 clubs in 200 cities.  The clubs provided gymnasiums, vocational classes and libraries.  Dues were only a few cents a month.  He served as vice-president of the Crime Prevention Bureau of New York City from 1928 to 1933.  This group worked to prevent boys from becoming juvenile delinquents.  In 1928 he became a trustee for the Children's Aid Society.   

Hall received many honors for his efforts.  Harvard University presented him with an honorary degree in 1936.  That same year, he received a Gold Medal from the National Institute of Social Sciences.  The CYO (Catholic Youth Organization) awarded him the Medal of Champions. (By the way, he was an Episcopalian and a warden of Christ Church).  The Boy Scouts of America gave him the Silver Buffalo medal for his focus on improving the lives of young boys. Mayor LaGuardia presented him with the Boys' Exposition Gold Medal on behalf of his efforts. He also served on many professional boards such as the National Institute of Science, the Yale Club and the Greenwich Community Chest.  Locally he was a member of the Field Club, Round Hill Club and Boys Club.

Use Me Hall.jpg

William E. Hall died on January 25, 1961 in Palm Beach, Florida.  He used his station in life to help improve the lives of those less fortunate than him.  His efforts no doubt changed the lives of many young men.

Greenwich has had many residents, who have been active in community service.  That's one thing that makes this a special community.  Thank you to Mr. Hall, and all the other residents, who work for the benefit of all.


SOURCE

Who's Who In Greenwich, Greenwich Time; 9/21/1942.

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