Snow White and The Seven Dwarfs

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If you've ever turned from Shore Road down Tomac Avenue in Old Greenwich, you may have noticed a white wall with painted images of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs separating 31 Shore Road from 3 Tomac Court.  I searched our newspaper index to see if I could find an article that had any information. Couldn't find anything.   I then decided to try and contact the owner of the wall.  This wasn't as easy as you'd think!   I couldn't tell who owned the wall.  So like any good Librarian, I checked out Google Maps to find the addresses of both properties, and used the Reverse Phone Directory to find some names and phone numbers.  I got no answer at either address, so had to leave my phone number.

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SNOW WHITE MURAL

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

After several days of phone tag, I received a call from a gentleman who lived at 3 Tomac Court.  He told me that Lorraine and Fred Cofone on Shore Road had the wall painted, and that there was a very interesting story behind it.  Finally, I was able to get Lorraine Cofone on the phone, and she was very helpful.  She explained much of the history, and told me that her neighbor at the time had called the newspaper.  A reporter came down, interviewed them and took some pictures.  The article and photo appeared in the Thursday, November 20, 1975, edition of the Village Gazette.

According to the newspaper, the Cofones had painted the wall white, and it looked very plain.  When Lorraine asked her husband, Fred, what they should do about it, he suggested a painting of Snow White.  They had a 16-month son at the time, and they had it painted for him.

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SNOW WHITE MURAL NEAREST TO TOMAC ROAD

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was an animated fantasy developed by Walt Disney in 1937. Most of us know the story of the stepmother who tries to kill her, the Dwarfs who take her in, and the handsome Prince who awakens her with a kiss.  Disney was awarded an honorary Oscar, and the movie was nominated for the best musical score in 1938.  It was added to the National Film Registry in 1989, and is considered one of the American Film Institutes 100 Greatest Films of All Time.

The wall was first painted in 1975 by an artist, Marcia Tartaglia.  Marcia was a Cos Cob resident and friend of the family.  She graduated from Greenwich High School, had studied art at Norwalk Community College, worked at the Carnival Card Shop and designed labels for a line of seed packets. Residents may remember the images she painted for the Bon-Ton Fish Market on Greenwich Avenue years ago.  When the Cofones approached her to paint the Snow White mural on their wall, she looked in a Disney color book of Snow White for some ideas. 

Marcia began the process by sketching the image of Snow White on the white wall.  Then she painted in the colors.  This had to be done on days when the weather was good.  She then finished the dwarfs in order:  Dopey, Sneezy, Bashful, Sleepy, Happy, Grumpy and Doc. Marcia enhanced the painting by adding images of birds, small animals, a Diamond Mine and some grass. When you turn the corner from Shore Road, you see Snow White waving at you! 

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OTHER END OF WALL.  NOTICE IMAGE OF HEIDI THE DOG.

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

The artist wasn't alone when she painted!  The family dog, Heidi, stayed close by, watching the progress.  The big, gentle German Shepherd loved to lie in the sun between the images of Sneezy and Bashful.  As a tribute to the dog, Marcia included Heidi's image at the far end of the wall.  It's a life-size portrait - one that the real Heidi likes to lie next to.

Marcia had never been to Disneyland in California;  but she had been to Walt Disney World in Florida.  She believed that was much better than the west coast attraction.

Over the years, the mural faded.  In the summer of 2014, the Cofones once again hired an artist to refurbish the wall.  Their current dog befriended the artist, and followed the painter around the property!

The wall is somewhat of a "tourist attraction".  School students come by on a bus for what's called an "Early American Tour".   It's considered a local historical site.  Strangers have stopped by to take pictures, and thank the Cofones for the mural.  Since it's very close to the intersection, drivers have to be very careful when they stop to take pictures. 

Many thanks to Lorraine Cofone for sharing this very interesting story with us!


SOURCE

Clark, El: "Disney World on Tomac Avenue!":  Village Gazette, Old Greenwich CT, 20 Nov. 1975, Print


Staying On Time

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No doubt you've noticed the clocks on Greenwich Avenue.  There are two of them:  one outside Betteridge Jewelers at 119 Greenwich Avenue, and one across from the old Post Office in front of the Christian Science Reading Room at 333 Greenwich Avenue.(There are also similar clocks in Old Greenwich, in front of the Town Hall and next to the Cos Cob Firehouse.)  I found out the original one at 333 Greenwich Avenue was manufactured by the E Howard Clock Company near Boston MA.  This company also built the steeple clock for Harkness Memorial Hall at Yale University in New Haven.

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According to The Greenwich Mail newspaper, the clock was installed at 333 Greenwich Avenue in 1926. It was originally built for someone else, but it was never picked up.  Mr. William D. Hill, who owned the Lester H. Denson Jeweler store, bought it for $500, which was a bargain back then. He used to go out and wind the clock.  If he forgot, someone passing by would stop in and remind him.  It was rumored that the clock was always within 30 seconds of the correct time.  I can envision train passengers checking the clock to make sure they were on time!  In the 1930s, the Town passed an ordinance banning advertising; the clock was considered advertising,  but disaster was averted when a variance was granted, and the clock remained.  The clock is 13-feet high, and was painted green to match the trim of the jewelry store.  Later it was painted black because the owner thought it looked better.  The face is made of marble, and the inside contains a wooden pendulum.  By 1978, the clock was still running well and only required an annual cleaning and oiling.  People rushing to the train station used to think it was running too fast, and would stop to tell the jewler; but it was very accurate, and commuters often missed their train!

Denson's son-in-law, William Dudley Hill, worked at the store and owned it from 1966 to 1978 - at which time he retired.  The new owner donated the clock to the town in the 1980s. The jewelry store finally closed, and a Christian Science Reading Room took its place.  A volunteer from the Reading Room would wind the clock until the the Town took over the winding duties.  A mail clerk from Town Hall would come over every Tuesday to wind it. A local TV station even came down to film the winding for one of its shows about Fairfield County.   At one point, the clock was even electrified to light it up and make it easier to read.   It was considered the Town's unofficial standard of time.     
 

In 1990, the clock began to show signs of wear and tear.  Eventually the clock stopped working all together, and the hands were stuck at 2:28. They didn't move for 6- to 8- weeks until it was fixed. The Town's Superintendent of Buildings and Manitenance, who was now responsible for winding the clock, arranged to have it sent to the E. Howard Company for repair. The repairs cost $2500.  When it was returned, it still wasn't right!  The Town then consulted Clockmaster Richard Brown from Sherman CT.  Within two minutes, he had it running like a clock!  A screw had worked its way loose due to the change in temperature when the mechanism was moved from a warm interior to the outside, where it was near freezing. Retired executive and clock enthusiast William Diefenback helped find rare parts to keep the clock in good repair.  Between 1990 and 1995, the clock underwent annual cleaning, and was checked for wear and tear.

In Old Greenwich, John Martello, owner of Sam's Liquor Store and President of the Old Greenwich Merchants Association, spearheaded a campaign to have a similar clock installed in the village.  A 11-foot electric clock was installed on Sound Beach Avenue around 2000.  It has a backup battery in case of a power outage, and it's programmed to automatically adjust for Daylight Savings Time. It even plays chimes!  The original cost was $15,000.

Then in 2000, the owner of Betteridge Jewelers wanted to have the old clock at 333 Greenwich moved in front of his store at 119 Greenwich Avenue so he could better maintain it.  After two years of applying for permits, he decided it would be much easier to install another clock.  He contacted the E. Howard Company to see if they had any used clocks, but none were in working order.  However, they were able to use the same mold to create a custom clock.  The inner workings were made by Rolex, and you can see the logo on the clock face today.The clock is slightly lower than the old clock, and cost $12,000.

The retro clocks are considered landmarks in the Town.  They add character, and remind us of earlier times.  I hope they're around for many years.  Even though time moves on, these relics are a constant.  For some reason, it's calming and peaceful to see them.  Maybe it's the familiarity.  Whatever the reason, they're part of Greenwich history.


SOURCES

Greenwich: 90 Years in Pictures:  The Greenwich Mail, 1968; Greenwich CT

Greenwich Time:  Time Warner Communications; Southwestern Connecticut Newspapers


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ARCH STREET FERRY TICKET OFFICE

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

Two favorite destinations for local residents who don't have the time or money to travel extensively in the summer is Little Captain's Island (Island Beach) or Great Captain's Island.  Connected to Island Beach by a sand spit at low tide is Wee Captain's Island, a privately-owned property.  It's believed that these islands were named after Captain Daniel Patrick, who was a pre-Revolutionary War commander.  He and the Feakes purchased land in Old Greenwich from the Native-Americans..

The first known private owner of the islands was Dr. Nathaniel Worden, who sold them to Justus Bush. When Bush died in 1760, the islands were left to his son, Justus Bush III, and some other children.  In 1761, New York resident John Anderson petitioned his state for ownership of the islands.  Anderson was granted a patent, which in effect gave him dual ownership.  In 1764, Justus Bush sued Anderson for trespassing, when he found Andeson cutting wood on Great Captain's Island.  the Superior Court of Fairfield County found in favor of Bush, and thus Connecticut.  Ownership remained a point of contention between New York and Connecticut until 1879, when a special commission granted the islands to Connecticut.


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FERRY DEPARTING ISLAND BEACH

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

During the 20th Century, Island Beach underwent many changes.  An Island Beach Corporation opened an amusement park on the island, featuring a merry-go-round, shooting gallery, booth games, goldfish tank, a dance hall, a restaurant and one- and three- room bungaloos. The carousel was operated by hand.  It was eventually removed since someone had been injured on the ride. Over time, business fell off due to the short season and World War I. Judge James Walsh, who was a First Selectman, State Senator and State Treasurer, owned it for a while.  Then, business dropped off greatly due to tough economic times and the shortage of men enlisting during World War I.   In 1916, the island was up for sale, but, unfortunately, the RTM rejected the purchase in 1918 since they were involved in purcahsing Sandy Point Beach off Mead's Point as a public beach.  Eventually, the Sandy Beach  sale fell through.  Then two families, the Lauders and the Greenways, bought the island, and donated It to the town as a gift for use by the townspeople on October 24, 1918.  It was donated in memory of George L. Lauder, Jr, who died of influenza at the age of 37.  The famous fighter Gene Tunney was present at the ceremony. (He had married Polly Lauder). 

Two Mead's Point residents-Mrs. Wilks and Mrs. Campbell-donated money for a ferry.  The first one (the Island Beach) sailed in 1920.   Sanford Mead was the Captain, and he was assisted by engineer Winfield Mills.  In 1937 another boat - The Indian Harbor - was purchased.  It could hold up to 256 passengers.  Riders paid 10-cents to ride, while children rode for free during the week.  On weekends, children paid 10-cents to ride.   Island Beach became so popular that people started coming out by train from New York City.  It wasn't long before the ferry became overcrowded.  Private boat owners seized the opportunity to make some extra money.  They charged 25-cents to carry the overflow of people to the island.  One owner from Stamford sailed the 50-foot sailboat Massasoit with passengers, who got soaking wet since there was no cabin for the riders to sit in!  To address the problem of overcrowding, the town introduced beach cards to limit use to residents. However, this was not effectively enforced until the 1950s.


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 REMNANTS OF CAROUSEL ON ISLAND BEACH

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

Since there's now a full-time caretaker on the island, it's necessary for the person to have a boat to get back and forth to the mainland.  He has to bring in his own supplies.  Water has to be shipped out by boat since wells cannot be used due to saltwater intrusion. At one point, water had to be stored in wooden barrels. In 1936, a 10,000 gallon tank was installed for water. Toilets use saltwater. 

It's an ideal job for someone seeking solitude since no one comes after the summer ferry stops.  At one time during the 1980s, a writer had the job.  He loved the isolation.  Some families have lived on the island, making it necessary to take the children daily to the mainland to attend school, etc.  It takes a certain type of person to live this kind of lifestyle.


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PIER AND DOCK AT ISLAND BEACH

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

Over the years, weather has had a profound effect on the island. In 1860, Greenwich Harbor and Long Island Sound froze over.  A man claimed he was able to walk all the way to Long Island from Greenwich.  The same thing happened in 1917 and 1934.  In 1938, the bungaloos were knocked off their foundations by the Great Hurricane, and in 1955 the dock was ruined by a windstorm.  Three bungaloos were also washed away.  More recently, in 1980 the Beach House and dock was ruined.  The White Hurricane of 1992 ruined the dock, and Hurricane Sandy did the same, making it necessary to postpone the opening of Island Beach until July.

The lawsuit to open Greenwich beaches in 1996 led to changes in the fee structure and access to Greenwich beach facilities for out-of-towners.  Fears of overcrowding were premature.  Out-of-towners now have to get a temporary town pass as well as a ticket to ride the ferry.  On the weekends, you'll find the greatest number of people taking advantage of the barbeque grills and refreshing waters of Long Isalnd Sound.  On warm days, you'll usually find the air is several degrees lower than the mainland.  You also get a great view of the Manhattan skyline.


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BASE OF FLAGPOLE WITH DEDICATION TO LAUDER FAMILY

PHOTO BY CARL WHITE

One of my favorite events is the free concert by a Dixieland Band.  They usually board a 4:30 ferry, and play while the boat heads down Greenwich Harbor to Island Beach.  After an hour of entertaining people on the island, they re-board the ferry, and play all the way back to the Arch Street dock. 


Another special event is a "Cruise to Nowhere".  Several times in the summer, the boat heads out to destinations like Oyster Bay. You can't get off because the boat doesn't dock;  but if you're like me, it satisfies your need for a longer cruise.


We're very fortunate to have this town park available to the public.  It's a great place to take the children anytime.  Many residents view the trip out to Island Beach as a "mini-vacation"!


SOURCES

Island Beach: An Oral History Interview
Oral History Project. Friends of the Greenwich Library
Greenwich, CT.: Greenwich Library, 1979


Recently, I wrote about the Mianus River and Natural Park in Greenwich.  This is just one of the many beautiful conservation areas in Greenwich.   Another favorite area is the Montgomerey Pinetum Park on Bible Street in Cos Cob. 

In 1880, Fred Gotthold, President of the Gotthold Company - a straw goods manufacturer - purchased 55-acres on Bible Street.  He and his wife, Florence, built the "Wild Acres" estate. This included an 18-room Mansard-roofed mansion, a guest cottage, laundry building, ice house, water tower, wood shed, cow barn, garage, gardener's cottage, chicken houses ands a small barn.  They also enjoyed plantings, which included a one-half-acre perennial garden, flower gardens, orchard, walled garden and 2-acre lawn.  There was also a 2-acre vegetable garden.  Brooks and ponds divided the property, and there was a substantial hemlock grove.  By the 1920s, the Gottholds decided to downsize and put the estate up for sale.

Colonel Robert H. Montgomerey, and his wife Nell, purchased "Wild Acres" in 1928.  Montgomerey had been a CPA, soldier in 2 wars, a university professor and a writer.  He was looking for a hobby that would be educational, create beauty and provide public enjoyment.  So he decided to create a "pinetum" - a collection of pines.  Since Nell was an artist, Robert had a field studio built with a landscape view.  He also had a primrose garden built, which spanned a brook.  Other plantings included forget-me-nots, grape hyacinth and barberry.  Over time, the estate grew to 125-acres.

Montgomerey made many improvements.  He added a greenhouse to grow fruit trees, which required a hgh roof.  A formal entrance with stone columns was constructed on Stanwich Road.  In 1930, stone retaining walls were built along the main entry drive.  Montgomerey had 850 species of conifers inventoried over a 2-and-a-half year period.  They were photographed with handwritten notes.  By the end of his life, he had donated over 200 species of trees to the New York Botanical Gardens.

Colonel Montgomerey died in 1952.  His wife donated the 125-acres to the Town.  The gift specified that visitors be restricted to walking trails, the park be used for the cultivation of arts and horticulture, and that the Town could sell off portions if necessary in the future.  Initially, the Town Meeting rejected the gift due to the expense of upkeep.  Supporters convinced conservationist Helen Binney Kitchell to speak to the RTM about the value of the land, and the meeting voted unanimously to accept it.  The Town made immediate plans to demolish all the buildings with the exception of one wing of the mansion.


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MAP OF THE EXPANDED PARK SYSTEM

COURTESY OF THE MONTGOMEREY PINETUM PARK COALITION

Over the years, the Town has made many improvements to Montgomerey Pinetum. The property has been modernized to make it more suitable as a park.  Land was cleared to give a better view from the mansion to the pond.  In 1955 a parking lot was built for those coming to skate on the ponds. A new lavatory was added in 1956, and in 1958 the remaining west wing of the mansion was repaired.  The University of Connecticut developed some planting plans, and a rock garden was installed on the south lawn.

It was in 1957 that the Town created the Garden Education Center. It's purpose was to inspire public interest in better gardening.  Two-thousand square feet of classrooms and workspace was created and the greenhouse was expanded. A Town nursery was started to grow fledgling shrubs.  The State recognized the greenhouse as an historic structure in the 1990s, and in 1993 it was added to the State Register of Historic Structures.  As part of a Master Plan in 1999, an inventory of existing park features was completed, and in 2000 a plan was put together to improve the park by adding handicap access, and expanded parking.

In 2003, the Town acquired the Pomerance Property off Orchard Street, which is adjacent to Pinetum and added 75 additional acres of woodlands.  Then, in 2007 the Tuchman Property added 31 more acres.  It's now possible to hike the entire area.

Today Montgomerey Pinetum is a favorite destination for nature lovers.  Just off the flagstone terrace of the main building are beautifully manicured lawns.  The reflecting pool remains, and tulips, daffodils and azaleas accentuate the grounds.  Tree species include Weeping Hemlock and Japanese Threadleaf Maples.  Visitors can walk a short tree identification walkway.  Several high rock outcroppings provide a beautiful vantage point of the forestlands.  One of these is the Joseph Hartman Outlook. This feature is in the northern part of the park, and was named after a man loved the New England wilderness. A large picnic area is available for those who wish to enjoy a meal in the outdoors.  The Greenwich Audubon Society  maintains the Mildred Bedard Caldwell Wildlife Sanctuary, which is bordered by Pinetum Lane, Bible Street,  and Cat Rock Road, to the northeast of Pinetum.  There is a trail from the Sanctuary, which leads directly to Montgomerey Pinetum.  

Due to siltation, public skating at Montgomerey Pinetum has ceased.  It's still a fabulous place to visit year round.  The fall is especially colorful in the Pinetum.  Although it's closed from November 15 to March 15, it's opened most days from 8 am to sunset.   Hiking boots are recommended, and insect repellent in the warm months is a good idea. 


SOURCES

"Montgomerey Pinetum Park." Montgomerey Pinetum Park. Town of Greenwich. Web. 1 May 2015.   http://www.grewichct.org/upload/..../HLR-Section-6-Pinetum.pdf.


Montgomerey Pinetum. Town of Greenwich. Web. 1 May 2015. http://www.greenwichct.org/upload/medialibrary/338/HLR-Section_6-Pinetum.pdf.



Havemeyer Park Housing Project

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One of the most interesting neighborhoods in town is Havemeyer Park in Old Greenwich.  It lies just to the west of the town line with Stamford, and offers a contrast to the housing projects and new condos just across the town line.  Although the houses are basically the same style (Cape Cod houses), each one has its own unique character.  The houses were originally built to provide housing for the many Veterans returning from World War II


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Originally, the land where Havemeyer Park was built belonged to H.O. Havemeyer. Henry (or Harry) was an industrialist and sugar maker.  He was born in New York City on October 18, 1847.  He studied at Bellport Academy on Long Island, then transferred to Bett's School in Stamford.  It's reported that he had a run in with the Principal, and left school permanently at the age of eight.  This was the extent of his formal education.  Since his family was well established, he became the President and owner of the American Sugar and Refining Company.  Havemeyer's nickname was "Sugar King".  H.O. owned a sugar plantation in Cuba, and shipped his sugar cane by boat to New York.  He cornered the market in sugar all over the country.

In 1888, Havemeyer bought 85 acres about 2 blocks up from the Boston Post Road.  He decided to build his "Hilltop" estate. The view of Long Island Sound was magnificent in those days.  It took 3-years for men to clear the land and construct the buildings.  This included a mansion, barn, 3 greenhouses, a gardener's cottage and an artesian well. There was no bathroom - residents had to use an outhouse. Havemeyer raised cows, chickens and pigs.  He grew apples, grapes, figs, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, tomatoes and vegetables.  His pride and joy, however, was his orchids, roses and gardenias.  These varieties won him many prizes at New York flower shows.

Like many other Greenwich residents, the Havemeyer family lived a very rustic life  There was no electricity or running water.  Kerosene lamps were used for lighting. The roads were still dirt, and Mr. Havemeyer had to take a horse and buggy to the train station, post office and grocery store.  Actually, they were pretty self-sufficient when it came to food since they grew a lot of fruits and vegetables.  Havemeyer had cottages built on the estate so he could invite guests for the weekend.

It's a well-known fact that the Havemeyer family was very generous to the Town of Greenwich.  They bought and gave  the Town the triangular park in front of the Post Office where the obelisk now resides.  They also donated $250,000 for the Havemeyer School. Old Greenwich School and the First Presbyterian Church were also recepients of their generosity. Mrs. Havemeyer was a volunteer who supported Women's Suffrage,  and she belonged to the National Women's Party.

They were the first to buy Impressionist paintings by Degas and Monet and have them imported to the United States. (They were close friends of artist Mary Cassatt, by the way.) A large part of their art collection was given to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  H.O. Havemeyer passed away on December 4, 1907.

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PHILANTHROPIST H.O.HAVEMEYER


It was after World War II (1946) that Gene Tunney became interested in the Havemeyer property.  Tunney was a professional boxer, and was the world heavyweight champion from 1926 to 1928.  He married Polly Lauder from an influential Greenwich family.  She was related to Andrew Carnegie.  Tunney had had an interesting life, serving as a Marine, working as a lumberman in Canada, and even lecturing at Yale University!  He was committed to providing housing for returning veterans.  So in 1946 he purchased 149 acres for $173,600 from the Havemeyer estate.  There were several stipulations, however:

 1.  Each lot must have a 60-foot front,
 2.  the cost couldn't be more than $10,000, and
 3.  the first units had to be finished by 1947

Tunney employed the Stamford Building Company to handle the construction, while Fairfield Realty handled the sales.  Arthur Starck, a friend of Tunney, helped organize a Havemeyer Park Builders corporation, and a sales trailer was set up at the corner of Havemeyer Lane and the Boston Post Road. Starck was named Secretary / Treasurer.

Initial plans called for the inclusion of a California-style (strip mall)  shopping center at the corner of Florence and MacArthur Drive.  This would include a Bradlee's department store, food stores, drugstores, etc. This never came about because the Town and residents were worried about traffic and the "unsavory" element it might attract.  This property was rocky, and not suitable for any kind of housing construction.  The Havemeyer Park Builders wanted to donate the property to the town, but officials were suspicious.  They considered the land unbuildable;  but the Town finally relented, and accepted the gift.  Surprisingly, part of the land was eventually used to build Dundee School! 

The average house in Havemeyer Park was built on a quarter-of-an-acre.  It was a Cape Cod style with 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, a livingroom, an attic crawlspace or unfinished attic, built on a slab and later full cellars.  Standardization helped keep the costs down.  They weren't well graded - owners had to plant their own grass.  Roads weren't paved at first.  The construction company didn't want to incur the cost of putting in roads, so the Town took them over.  The Town also offered to plant cherry or dogwood trees for $15 each.  This was a good deal.  Some residents dug up bushes and trees from the old Havemeyer mansion.  Eventually, the mansion was razed to make room for more housing.

In 1948, residents decided to organize a Havemeyer Park Owners Association.  This grew out of concerns for roads and traffic. Owners were concerned about additional traffic spilling out onto Havemeyer Lane from Stamford.  Representatives met with Stamford officials, who agreed to abandon plans for additional  roads to add traffic to Havemeyer Lane.  Since the association had no money or legal representation, it had to rely on the good will of people to preserve its neighborhood character.  Most people complied with requests from the neighbors and the owners' association.

Once the houses were built, they sold out very quickly.  Buyers were mostly veterans, who could get FHA mortgages through the GI Bill.  Only $1,000 was required as a downpayment on a $10,000 house.  Today, those houses would sell for between $375,000 and $450,000.  The Veterans were usually married with young children.  Since they didn't have a lot of money, most of the families would socialize with each other.  They organized Christmas decoration contests, Valentine's Dances, picnics, bowling leagues, tennis groups, barbeques, garden clubs, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts.

Over time, the families would save money and move to bigger houses in town.  Havemeyer Park became known as a "starter community".  Older people looking to downsize, and other ethnic groups moved into the Park.  The population started to become more diversified.  Of course, some residents remained since they like the community.

Meanwhile, development just over the Stamford line threatens to change traffic patterns in the area. .  A newly-constructed condo complex (including an access road) includes a rotary that may change the flow of traffic on Havemeyer Lane.  Plans for a big box Home Depot structure near the old Cyanamid building were abandoned due to public protests. A shopping mall adjacent to Laddin's Rock Road could spill over the Town line.  There is plenty of land near Havemeyer Park that could still be developed.  

 The Park, which stretches roughly from Havemeyer Lane to Florence Road and Palmer Hill Road to the Boston Post Road, remains a thriving and vibrant community.  Residents take pride in their homes and property.  The Homeowners Association still watches over developments in the area.  Everyone is committed to maintaining the rural nature of the Town.  Havemeyer Park will always remain a unique part of Greenwich.



SOURCE

Havemeyer Park : Oral History Interview
Oral History Project. Friends of the Greenwich Library
Greenwich, CT : Greenwich Library, 2002

 
 

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