Recently in Cult Films Category

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Read all about it here.

Repo Man will be shown at Greenwich Library on Thursday,  January 15 at 7:00 pm in the second floor meeting room.  Rated R. More details here.

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REPOMAN.pngGreenwich Library Cult Films returns Thursday, January 15th at 7:00 PM in the second floor meeting room.  (Yes, you can bring cushions.)  We'll be showing 1984's Repo Man.  Here's a quick description:

Aimless young punk Otto (Emilio Estervez) gets hired by Bud (Harry Dean Stanton) to repossess cars that owners failed to make payments on. Then one day, Otto, other repo men, and government agents all race to find a certain Chevy Malibu which may or may not have dead aliens from outer space in the trunk...



This is a wild, almost surreal comedy-thriller  by writer-director Alex Cox that never lags in its pacing. The musical soundtrack evokes the 80s with songs by Iggy Pop, Black Flag, and Fear, among others.  All 92 minutes of it is in color and rated R for violence and language.

We'll also be having a guest speaker, my colleague Everett Perdue, who'll go in more detail about the movie and its significance (artistic and otherwise) then and now, and will answer any questions you might have.

For more info, head to our Cult Films page here.  Our next film following Repo Man will be the 1963 James Bond thriller, From Russia With Love on Thursday, February 19th at 6:30 PM in the meeting room.  See you there!

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The latest installment in Greenwich Library's Cult Films series, Sergio Leone's A Fistful Of Dollars, starring Clint Eastwood, will be shown on Wednesday, November 5th, beginning at 6:30 pm.  More details here.  Below is the original trailer:



Dollars, made & released in 1964 in Europe (the US got to see it for the first time in January, 1967), was a thinly disguised remake of Akira Kurosawa's 1961 film Yojimbo, itself influenced by Dashiell Hammett's 1929 novel, Red Harvest. Directed by Sergio Leone, Dollars was an Italian/Spanish/German co-production, shot in Almeria, Spain (exteriors), with indoor sequences (interiors) shot in Italy.  The cast was made up of various Italian, German and Spanish actors, including Marianne Koch and Gian Maria Volante, and it's music was composed by then-unknown Ennio Morricone.

Leone, reportedly given a $200,000 budget, wanted to shake up the western genre, which he felt had gone stagnant. After being rejected by Henry Fonda and Charles Bronson, Leone hired the then popular star of TV's Rawhide, Clint Eastwood for $15,000 to portray the protagonist, a mysterious gunman who rides into a town controlled by two warring families, the Baxters and the Rojos, and seeing a possible monetary profit, decides to pit one faction against the other.

Eastwood's "Man With No Name" (actually he's called "Joe" in the film) is about as far apart as a traditional western hero as you can get. Add various violent gun fight sequences that are quickly and stylishly edited and some witty dialogue, and Dollars became  an international artistic and financial success.  Leone of course went on to do two sequels with Eastwood, eventually even working with both Henry Fonda and Charles Bronson in 1969's Once Upon A Time In The West, as well as other films, before his death in 1989.

(BTW Here's a really good article on Leone's influence.)

The program begins at 6:30 pm in the library's meeting room on the second floor.  The film, dubbed in English, runs about 100 minutes and is in color.  Rated R. 

I usually begin each screening with a brief discussion of the film's production and it's influence over the decades. Both film buffs and ingénues are welcome.  Hope you can join us.  And click here to see what we'll be showing next!

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On November 5th, at 6:30  pm, Greenwich Library Cult Films presents the 1964 spaghetti western A Fistful of Dollars, starring Clint Eastwood.  Directed by Sergio Leone, this terrific film made a big impact on the western genre (and films in general) when it first came out.  It was released in America in January, 1967.

Below is the trailer for the film:



For more info about the program, click here.


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The latest installment in our Cult Films program, 2013's You're Next, will be shown at Greenwich Library's second floor meeting room on Thursday, October 16th, beginning at 6:30 pm.  For more info about that evening's program, click here.

Completed in 2011 but not released in the US until two years later, You're Next is just the type of work that would qualify as a cult film.  Independently made, low budgeted (about $1 million), mostly unknown cast (though I do remember Barbara Crampton from the H.P. Lovecraft films she did for director Stuart Gordon back in the 80s), and not as well promoted as the latest Marvel superhero picture, You're Next is a clever, compelling, exciting and scary thriller that'll leave you shaking by the end.

Director Adam Wingard and writer Simon Barrett set the story in an isolated vacation home during a family reunion.  Trouble starts early when neighbors living nearby are killed by an assailant wearing a lamb mask.  Soon the lamb masked killer is joined by other disguised partners as they carry out an intense home invasion against the family.  But why are they trying to kill the family?  And is somebody inside the house working with the killers...? 

Wingard and Barrett (who also did the recently released-in-theatres The Guest) were obviously influenced by directors like Mario Bava and Dario Argento, as well as the Friday the 13th slasher films.  But their film is classier and wittier.  They emphasize shock and intense violence, but balance everything out with humor and actual characterization.  Nobody in the film is only a walking target. 

You're Next is rated R due to violence.  Not recommended for kids under 17.  It's in color and runs 95 minutes.  If you're interested, stop by the meeting room this Thursday.  And check out our website here. for future programs.

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Boy, do I got a cult film candidate for you!  Hammer Films' bizarre, almost insane mashup of their horror films and the then popular kung fu  craze , 1974's The Legend of the Seven Golden Vampires, is one of the most outlandish but strangely entertaining films they ever produced.  (Click here to reserve our copy.)


 
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Just in time for Halloween, the next installment of Greenwich Library's Cult Films program will present the 2013 film You're Next on October 16th at 6:30 pm in the Meeting Room.  This very violent but stylish thriller (NOT for kids) is rated R and runs about 95 minutes.  Below is the original  trailer for the film that came out in August of last  year:


Watch this space for more updates about the event.  And check out the Cult Films page too!

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Greenwich Library Cult Films, our new series of programs devoted to bringing various classic movies from Hollywood, Europe and the rest of the world that have continued to entertain audiences and influence new film makers, returns WEDNESDAY NIGHT, SEPTEMBER 10th at 6:30 PM. We'll be showing the 1964 James Bond 007 film "Goldfinger" starring Sean Connery as Bond.


This was the third official 007 installment in the popular series, released fifty years ago this month in Europe. (The film reached American shores three months later.) First time Bond director Guy Hamilton, working from a tight script by Richard Maibaum and Paul Dehn, does a great job mixing suspense and humor, without descending into broad comedy.

And the cast! Sean Connery (my favorite Bond!) is at his most confident and assured, tossing off one-liners and punches without breaking a sweat. Gert Frobe as Goldfinger and Harold Sakata as Oddjob are outstanding as the main villains while Honor Blackman makes the most of her role as pilot Pussy Galore. Note Shirley Eaton's brief but memorable performance as Jill Masterson, who receives a rather bizarre fate at the hands of Oddjob.

This is the Bond film that kicked off the 60s spy mania. There are gadgets galore, including the classic Aston Martin DB5 with its various functions (don't press that red button!). The production design of the film, including the fantastic Fort Knox set, is breathtaking! Composer John Barry created a unforgettable score and theme song, the latter belted out in style by Shirley Bassey!

The program begins at 6:30 pm (note time) in the second floor meeting room. The film runs 111 minutes and is in color. Rated (more or less) PG.

Check out my blog or Twitter account for updates and schedule changes. I usually begin each screening with a brief discussion of the film's production and its influence over the decades. Both film buffs and ingénues are welcome. Hope you can join us! And check out our future upcoming films by clicking here.

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The next installment of Greenwich Library's Cult Films program will be on Wednesday, September 10th at 6:30 pm in the second floor meeting room.  In celebration of it's fiftieth anniversary, we'll be showing the 1964 James Bond 007 thriller Goldfinger

Starring Sean Connery as Bond, with Honor Blackman, Gert Frobe and Harold Sakata, this was the film that unleashed Bondmania (and the secret agent craze) onto the public during the sixties. 

An overview of this film will be  in a future post. Meanwhile, here's the trailer:



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Greenwich Library Cult Films, our  series of programs devoted to bringing various classic movies from Hollywood, Europe and the rest of the world that have continued to entertain audiences and influence new film makers, returns Thursday night, August 14th at 6:00 PM.  We'll be showing the 1969 James Bond 007 film "On Her Majesty's Secret Service", starring George Lazenby, Diana Rigg, and Telly Savalas.  

 

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